December’s Bird Quiz

Can you identify this bird? The photo was taken in Texas during the month of January. The answer will appear next week.

12 December_LagunaAtascosaNWR-TX_LAH_3398Continue to see the answers from last week’s British birding terms quiz…

  1. Blocker: A bird that is rare in the area where you are birding, and hasn’t been seen in ages.
  2. Boggie Bird: We would know this as a nemesis bird—one we’ve been looking for, and by rights should have seen by now, but haven’t although we’d really like to.
  3. BOP: Bird of Prey
  4. Certs: Those stray birds (vagrants) that appear on a regular basis.
  5. Crippler: An amazing sighting, with the bird being both very rare and very big/beautiful/impressive. The idea is that the overwhelming emotion of the moment leaves you unable to function.
  6. Dip out: To miss seeing your target bird. The target bird (often a vagrant) is then called a dip.
  7. Dude: A casual birdwatcher, who doesn’t care how rare the bird is or if they have seen it before. They just enjoy looking at birds. Dudes usually stick to good weather and reasonable hours. This person is at the other end of the spectrum from a twitcher.
  8. Duff gen: Bad information on where to find a specific bird, or other incorrect information about the sighting.
  9. Get gripped off: When everyone else sees the target bird (usually a rarity), but, for a variety of reasons, you do not. Sometimes competitive birders grip someone off on purpose, which is not at all nice.
  10. Old badger: Derogatory term for an older, female birder who is looking a bit shopworn. What do they expect of someone who spends a lot of time outdoors in the sun and wind?

How did you do?

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One Response to December’s Bird Quiz

  1. Carey says:

    That last one just made me laugh out loud. And since I am willing to sit back and wait for your details on the little yellow warbler, that must make me a dude?

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