April Quiz: Uncropped Photo

If you were stymied on Monday, now can you name this bird? The photo was taken in California in April. The answer will appear at the end of next Monday’s post.

04 MorroBay-CA_LAH_0264

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2 Responses to April Quiz: Uncropped Photo

  1. William says:

    Re The sparrows. Is it true that “Red headed Finches” are indigenous to CA; were brought to the east coast for their beautiful song, as house pets, got loose, and found their way across the continent from the east, and established here? I’ve read such, and I find it kinda’ fascinating…!..?

    I have read the same about the Blue Jay. I don’t remember the first time I heard one in Colorado, but, and I do remember wondering why I hadn’t heard them before. I grew up with them. My Dad used to shoot them as a boy in the 30’s; they eat songbird young. I don’t remember ’em in the 70’s. I have read it was the planting of trees, allowing Blue Jays to nest their way across the continent. Please expound, this fascinates me.

    • LAH says:

      Yes, it’s my understanding that Blue Jays managed to cross the plains because we planted trees–or they finally took advantage of the native Cottonwoods. They’ve been in Colorado for several decades, so your memory is correct.

      By “red-headed finches” I assume you’re referring to House Finches? According to Wikipedia (not always accurate, but… )

      “Originally only a resident of Mexico and the southwestern United States, they were introduced to eastern North America in the 1940s. The birds were sold illegally in New York City as “Hollywood Finches”, a marketing artifice. To avoid prosecution under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, vendors and owners released the birds. They have since become naturalized; in largely unforested land across the eastern U.S., they have displaced the native purple finch and even the non-native house sparrow. In 1870, or before, they were introduced to Hawaii and are now abundant on all its major islands.”

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